Connect with us

Steelers Opponents

Former Steelers OT Marcus Gilbert’s Season Ends with Torn ACL

Published

on

The 2019 season has come to an abrupt end for former Steelers tackle Marcus Gilbert, who suffered a torn ACL, according to NFL Network’s Ian Rapoport and was placed on the injured reserve by the Arizona Cardinals on Tuesday.

Gilbert, who the Steelers traded to Arizona for a sixth-round pick in the 2019 NFL Draft, was expected to start at right tackle for the Cardinals, where he had spent most of the last eight seasons with the Steelers.

But staying on the field has been a consistent issue for Gilbert. He played in seven games in 2017 after a hamstring issue and a suspension and just five in 2018 after another knee injury.

After his injury last year, Matt Feiler emerged as a reliable starter and replaced Gilbert, making him expendable for a trade this offseason.

The Steelers drafted another Gilbert — inside linebacker Ulysees Gilbert III — with the pick received from the Cardinals.

Pittsburgh is scheduled to visit Arizona in Week 14.

Steelers Interviews

Steelers Rivals: Interview with Former Cleveland Browns FB Kevin Mack

Published

on

In the latest Steelers Rivalry interview, our Ron Lippock spoke with former Browns fullback Kevin Mack who played with the team from 1985-1993, making two Pro Bowls. 

First, can you let me know what you’ve been doing with yourself since your time in the NFL?

I’m  actually working for the Browns now – doing the alumni relations for the team. I got started with them in their player development – I was going to work my way towards becoming a scout – that’s when Phil Savage was there as the GM.

He told me though that it was going to be a slow process to get me over to the football side of the business. It was a blessing though because I got to work a lot with those younger guys, and now I have an opportunity to work with them as alumni. So it’s been great.

How was the post-NFL adjustment for you?

It’s definitely a process. I lived in Houston for 14 years and did some coaching at Texas Southern. I was trying to assess whether or not I wanted to put them time in as a coach that you need to put in. It was different – I had two young daughters I wanted to spend time with. After trying it out, I decided against coaching.

When you signed with Cleveland, were you aware of how intense the rivalry was then?

No, I wasn’t! No one realized how intense it was until they made the team and played in that first game.

It’s funny because a few of those guys I played against I knew. Louis Lipps – I met him when we went through the combine together and we got to be friends. It’ weird how many of those guys I knew and played against, Delton Hall was another guy – I played college ball with him. LeVon Kirkland went to the same school I did as well at Clemson. The games were intense but it was hard going against people you knew so well – especially the ones that played on the other side of the ball. It was difficult when they were on defense and they could be real nice guys, but when you played against them you wanted to knock each other’s heads off!

Any memories stand out to you from those games?

One game I remember – I guess it was funny at the time. We were playing Pittsburgh in Cleveland, and it never mattered what our records were. They were just battles. Well, I remember a play – we ran it on the left side and I stiff-armed someone – I think I did anyway. But I got more facemask than anything with my hand. I walked back to the huddle opening and closing my hand – something just felt funny but I didn’t look down at it until I got to the huddle. I saw then that my finger was snapped at the base of the knuckle – it was sticking out of the other side of my hand where my thumb was.

Well, I started running off the field when I saw that, but the guys on the sidelines didn’t know what was going on and kept trying to wave me back into the huddle. Then they saw my hand – I thought some of them were going to puke. It didn’t really bother me until the doctor tried to reset it. I was kicking and screaming on the ground while he was setting my finger, like a big baby. I didn’t even know he was done – I barely felt it – it took like a second and I was still kicking and screaming!

Any of the guys you face stand out to you most in those games?

Everyone seemed to play at a Pro Bowl level in those games – we fought for every inch.

One guy that stood out to me was Donnie Shell – he’d come up and lay the wood on you. It was unbelievable how tough he was. But I guess they had a long line of tough defensive backs there.

Kevin Greene was one of those guys that was always tough too. I wouldn’t tell those guys then, but I hated blocking him and some of those big linebackers they had. Lloyd too – he was a great player you always had to pay attention to.

Anything specific you did to prepare for those games?

As an individual, there are always certain assignments you have to pay attention to. As a fullback, I had to know my blocking assignments, and there was always a new twist every week our coaches brought in. And as a fullback, I had to work closely with the offensive line to make sure I was there to clean up any missed blocking assignments.

In practice, we always picked up the tempo in those weeks. We knew they wouldn’t be slow, boring games!

What do you think of the rivalry today and of this current Browns team?

I feel the same way I did when I played – I want to win that game every time we play Pittsburgh! But of course I have no control over that now.  I do try to convey to those guys today how big the game still is. The Steelers I think have the upper hand right now, but we’re getting the team back to where it used to be. I think it takes a couple of years to get it to where it was.

I think if these guys today could watch film of some of those games we played in, even though I know the rules have changes and you can’t do some of those things anymore – but if they could see the passion we played with in those games they’d be extra motivated. No matter what each team’s record was, you could never assume you’d win that game.

What do you think of the current Browns team?

I do like this current team’s makeup.  People don’t realize even though they out this team together and it has  lot of talent, that it’s till really in it’s first year. It’s not going to click right away. It’s the first year this team has been together and it takes repetitions before you get that chemistry. It’s a process that takes time – and that’s compounded when you have a new head coach and playcallers.

They are on the right track. I don’t get down with the losses – I know they will work on it and work it out. And the schedule the first half of the season had a lot of playoff teams they faced – so it’s a big learning lesson for them. Especially for a guy like Baker Mayfield. who’s in his second season. The second season is hardest because teams now have film on you and cam gameplan better against you. That makes a big difference as well.

Continue Reading

Steelers Interviews

Exclusive with Former Browns WR Derrick Alexander

Published

on

Our rivalry series continues with former Cleveland Browns wide receiver Derrick Alexander, who played for the Browns during their move to Baltimore following the 1995 season.

First, can you let us know what you’ve been doing with yourself since your time in the NFL?

Right now, I’m coaching at Morgan State. I’m coaching the wide receivers and am the passing game coordinator as well. So I’m just busy doing football stuff now.

Any coaching mentors that helped shape the way you approach coaching?

One coach that I really enjoyed playing for was my position coach Richard Mann – I played for him twice – in Baltimore and Kansas City. I was with him for two years in Baltimore then with Kansas City. When I coach, I try to teach my guys the same things he did. The way he approached the games and practices  – he was the best coach I ever had. I model my coaching after him.

What specifically did he teach you – what do you try and emulate?

His focus on technique and the intricacies of route-running. How to get open – those tips he gave me are what I try and teach as well.

You were there when the Browns moved to Baltimore. What was that whole experience like for you?

It was a big surprise. When I was drafted by Cleveland it was a good place for me to go. It was close to Detroit, where I was from. I loved playing there – we won a playoff game there when I was a rookie.

But that stadium – honestly, I couldn’t believe that was an NFL stadium. The practice facility was new – one of the better ones in the league. It was a great facility, but the stadium was a shocker.

The Browns fans were great. They were great to play for. It just didn’t feel real, getting the announcement that we were moving. It was like, it wasn’t really happening. Once the season was over we had to pack our stuff for the move and it was a weird feeling, No one knew anything about Baltimore – where to go, where to live. It was a big shock.

In a sense, you played then for two rival Pittsburgh teams, What was that rivalry like for you and how did it change from Cleveland to Baltimore?

It was definitely a big rivalry on both teams. In Cleveland my rookie season, we lost to them twice during the regular season. Then we played them a third time in the playoffs and got demolished. We lost to them three times in one season. For me, that started off the rivalry. I know it started well before I got there, but that’s what did it for me.

Then you move to Baltimore…

When we got to Baltimore, I remember playing them at home. When they came in we all said to ourselves we wouldn’t lose to them again. That game, I had one of the best games of my career and we won. That kicked off the Baltimore-Steelers rivalry – that was the game that did it

Who were some of the guys you looked forward to playing against in those games?

Rod Woodson of course – he was a Hall of Fame player and a guy you wanted to go up against as a receiver.  That was the guy no one wanted to throw at. Willie Williams was good too. They were great matchups – they were the types of guys you wanted to go up against. You had to go after those guys if you wanted to win.

You had some success against those guys – why was that?

Some guys you see so much of – those division guys you see over and over. You learn things about them you could attack. I’d keep a journal on those guys and study and figure out how to attack them and use those things I learned to help me.

For example?

Rod was a risk-reward type of guy, He was high risk high reward – he’d take chances to make plays. We’d have to be careful to try and not give things away. On slants, splits – little tings would help him read the routes. We couldn’t let him route-read. He’d see things – some of the concepts we’d show – and route-read those. So we’d try to use those concepts but change things up to trick him and make him guess wrong. A lot of double moves on him too.

Any fun m memories you can share of the rivalry?

It was a good rivalry – a lot of back and forth. We had a lot of respect for each other, We didn’t like each other but we did respect each other.

One game – the one I had 198 yards receiving – they tried to help me get those extra two yards. They wanted me to run a hitch route to get to 200 yards, The guys on the sidelines kept yelling at Rod – telling him he wasn’t that good – encouraging me to keep going at him. Just that banter – it was pretty good.

Any thoughts on the rivalry today?

I think it’s one of the best rivalries in football right now. Whoever wins those games usually wins the division. Its gone back and forth for years. It’s a tough, physical game. You have to be a tough guy to play in this game!

Continue Reading

Steelers

Browns DE Myles Garrett Apologizes to Mason Rudolph

Published

on

Cleveland Browns defensive end Myles Garrett has formally apologized to Steelers quarterback Mason Rudolph for his attack during the waning moments on Thursday night’s game.

Garrett released a statement through the Browns on Friday after the NFL had announced that he will be suspended for at least the remainder of the 2019 season.

“Last night, I made a terrible mistake,” Garrett wrote. “I lost my cool and what I did was selfish and unacceptable. I know that we are all responsible for our actions and I can only prove my true character through my actions moving forward. I want to apologize to Mason Rudolph, my teammates, our entire organization, our fans and to the NFL. I know I have to be accountable for what happened, learn from my mistake and I fully intend to do so.”

The Steelers issued their own statement through team president Art Rooney II. Steelers center Maurkice Pouncey was suspended for three games for punching and kicking Garrett.  

“As an organization, we are disappointed with what occurred last night near the end of our game against the Cleveland Browns,” Rooney wrote. “The actions of the players involved were not something that should be part of any football game.

“Our players, coaches and everyone in the Steelers organization understand that we must always maintain composure, no matter what happens. After a hard-fought game between two rivals, it is a shame that the game ended that way.”

Continue Reading

Steelers Now in Your Mailbox!

Enter your email address to subscribe and get notifications of new posts in your mailbox.

Moon Golf

Copyright © 2020 Pittsburgh Sports Now / Steelers Now. In no way affiliated with or endorsed by the Pittsburgh Steelers or NFL.

Steelers Now in your Inbox

Sign up and get all of our posts sent directly to your inbox!

Thank you!

Oops!

Send this to a friend